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Spice Up This Thanksgiving by Making your Own Turkey Stock

by Benjamin Sauerborn
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This Thanksgiving try something new and make your own stock using the carcass of your turkey, some vegetables, and seasonal aromatics. You can use this stock to make thanksgiving gravies, soups, and sauces that complement your thanksgiving dinner perfectly. Making turkey stock will require you to break down your turkey into its different parts. If you want a guide on how to break down and cook a turkey check out this link.

Fresh turkey stock

There are 2 different kinds of stock. White stock made from non-roasted bones and brown stock made from bones that are roasted. Generally brown stock has a deeper and richer flavor because of the flavors caramelization and the Maillard reaction produces.

After you’ve broken down and brined your turkey you have to roast the bones. Preheat the oven to 400°F, cover the bones in some olive oil, then roast for 35-40 minutes or until the bones are nice and browned (but not burnt).

Roasting a turkey carcass

Once the bones have been roasted place them into a large stockpot with 1-2 anise stars, a cinnamon stick, and 1/2 a tablespoon of whole cloves.  Fill the stockpot with water until it just covers the bones then place it on a high flame until it comes up to a simmer.

Once simmering turn the heat down to maintain a light simmer, cover with a lid, and skim off any scum that floats to the top. Simmer the stock for at least 7 hours before adding your vegetables and aromatics.

Filling a pot with aromatics and turkey carcass with water

When you make a stock add the vegetables only an hour before it finishes especially if you also roast your vegetables prior (which you should do). Cut up some carrots, celery sticks, garlic, mushrooms, some mild chilies, and half an onion. Cover them in a little olive oil then roast them at 400°F for 25-30 minutes until they’re browned and a little charred.

Vegetables ready to be roasted

Add the roasted vegetables into the simmering stock with a bunch of parsley, some sprigs of thyme, sage, and two bay leaves, then simmer the stock for another hour.

Herbs and aromatics in a stock pot

Strain the stock through a colander, then a sieve, and if there still some residue, through a cheesecloth. After this, you’ll have to cool your stock. There is a ‘danger zone’ for warm food where bacteria and pathogens are most active at 40°F and 140°F. At ideal temperatures, some pathogens can multiply as fast as once every 20 minutes so it’s important to cool it rapidly to avoid culturing any unwanted bacteria.

Odds are you don’t have and rapidly cooling restaurant equipment so try these methods:

  • Cooling small jars of stock in an ice bath
  • Placing small portions of stock in the freezer
  • Wrapping the jar in a moist towel and placing it in the freezer.

Fine straining stock

Turkey Stock Recipe

This Thanksgiving try something new and make your own stock using the carcass of… Recipes Spice Up This Thanksgiving by Making your Own Turkey Stock Southern Print This
Prep Time: Cooking Time:
Nutrition facts: 200 calories 20 grams fat
Rating: 5.0/5
( 1 voted )

Ingredients

3-4 tbsp olive oil

1 turkey carcass, roasted

2 anise stars

1 cinnamon stick

1/2 tbsp whole cloves

1 gallon of filtered water

2 carrots, peeled, diced, & roasted

1 white onion, halved & roasted

1 bulb of garlic, halved & roasted

3-4 mild chilies, roasted

1 bunch fresh Parsley

2-3 sprigs fresh Thyme

2-3 sprigs fresh Dill

1 sprig fresh Sage

2 Bay leaves

Instructions

  1. Place the roasted turkey carcass into a stock bot with the anise stars, cinnamon stick, and cloves. Cover with water and place onto a high flame until it comes up to a simmer.
  2. Turn the flame down to low then simmer the stock for 7 hours skimming off any scum that rises to the top.
  3. After 7 hours add the roasted vegetables and the fresh herbs then simmer the stock for one more hour.
  4. Strain the stock through a colander, then a mesh sieve, and then a cheesecloth to get rid of any residue.
  5. Jar and rapidly cool the stock then store in the fridge for up to a week.
  6. Alternatively, you can freeze the fresh stock for a long time.

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