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Bundt Cake

Much has been said about the history and origin of Bundt cakes. While many people consider Bundt cakes and Bundt pans as components of American culinary traditions, culinary historians argue that Bundt cakes originated from Germany inspired by the Gugelhupf, a brioche-cake.

 

Bundt cakes are distinctly known by their shapes, and much has evolved over the years. Classic bundt cakes resemble donuts by having a hole in the middle. Although people thought this was for aesthetic purposes, its function was to ensure an even heat distribution and faster baking time. Over the years, bundt cakes have evolved to various contemporary designs celebrating the classic round cakes and expanding to designs that mimic landscapes or shapes that commemorate festive activities.

Bundt Cake Trivia

  • The name “Bundt” cake is trademarked by Nordic Ware, a Minnesota company that is famously known for its Bundt pans.
  • There are no strict recipes or components for Bundt cakes. It only needs to look like a Bundt cake to be called one.
  • North America celebrates National Bundt Day every November 15.

Bundt Cake Buying Guide

Bundt cakes are readily available in bakeries, cafes, groceries, and supermarkets with different flavors such as vanilla, chocolate, and mocha. However, other flavors combine berries, fruits, and chocolates. You can purchase plain bundt cakes or the ones drizzled with icing sugar or royal icing. Bundt cakes with nuts, dried fruits, and chocolate chips are also a great choice for snacking.

Bundt Cake Production & Farming in Texas

Bundt cakes can be found anywhere in Texas, whether it’s freshly baked by a home-baker or manufactured by a baking company. There is no shortage of Bundt cake ingredients since Texas has vast fertile lands that produce the best and freshest organic ingredients to make the most delectable and filling bundt cakes.

 

Preservatives and Chemicals

While smaller bakeries make all-natural and organic bundt cakes, commercial manufacturers rely on additives to enhance the looks and flavors. Chemical preservatives are also added to extend shelf-life.

 

Food coloring and flavoring are the most common ways to convert a plain cake batter into an entirely different cake. A simple vanilla batter can be transformed into a pink strawberry cake or a purple blueberry cake through the magic of colorings and flavorings. However, too many of these additives can result in food allergies that will compromise people with underlying health conditions.

Chemical preservatives are added to enhance texture and mouthfeel. Compare eating a home-made cake from a commercially-produced one and you’ll see what I mean. Home-made cakes have a denser batter and a cleaner flavor compared to commercial cakes. Chemical preservatives harm the consumers’ health especially those with diabetes, hypertension, asthma, cancer, and other food allergies.

 

Packaging

Bundt cakes are dense. They hold their shape well and do not easily crumble when transported. Cool the cake after baking and place inside a transparent plastic, bundt cake container or in a cake box.

Enjoying Bundt Cakes

Bundt cakes are always a showstopper. It can be served as a dessert after lunches or dinners. Preparing Bundt cakes start with high-quality Bundt pans that will allow the batter to rise and yield the shapes and ridges. Bundt cakes are best eaten on their own paired with hot coffee and tea. Denser Bundt cakes can be paired with cream, jellies, jams, and preserves to cut the heaviness.

 

Storage

You don’t have to wait long to serve Bundt cakes the next time you need them. Bundt cakes can be served at room temperature after they’re cooled out of the oven. If you are baking Bundt cakes in advance, place them in an airtight cake box or container and refrigerate them for a day. Although you can make big batches and freeze them, Bundt cakes taste great after a day. Too much time at the freezer or the fridge will result in a tougher and drier texture which leads to an unpleasant mouthfeel.

 

Cooking

 

Olive oil Bundt Cake

 

Try this Mediterranean take on the classic Bundt Cake

 

Ingredients

3 large eggs, room temperature

1-1/2 cups sugar

3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

3/4 cup ground almonds

1/2 cup 2% milk

4 teaspoons grated orange zest

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

2 to 3 tablespoons orange juice

Sliced almonds, toasted, optional

 

 

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Grease and flour a 10-in. fluted tube pan.
  2. In a large bowl, beat eggs at high speed for 3 minutes. Gradually add sugar, beating until thick and lemon-colored. Gradually beat in oil. Beat in ground almonds, milk, orange zest, and vanilla.
  3. In another bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, and salt; fold into the egg mixture. Transfer batter to prepared pan, spreading evenly.
  4. Bake until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean, 45-50 minutes.
  5. Cool in pan 15 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely.
  6. For the icing, in a small bowl, whisk confectioners’ sugar and enough orange juice to reach drizzling consistency. Drizzle over cake. If desired, sprinkle with almonds.

 

Notes:

  1. Grease plain and fluted tube pans with shortening to easily remove cakes.
  2. This cake can also be paired with ground pistachios and lemon zest, or even dried fruits such as cranberries, apricots, and plums.

Nutrition

DV%

  • Serving Size: 1 Serving
  • Calories: 364
  • Carbs: 41.5g 13%
  • Sugar: 18.9g
  • Fiber: 0.3g 1%
  • Protein: 4.7g 9%
  • Fat: 20.4g 32%
  • Saturated Fat: 4.4g 22%
  • Trans Fat 0g 0%
  • Cholesterol 73.1mg 24%
  • Sodium 239.7mg 18%
  • Vitamin C 0mg 0%
  • Vitamin A 81.2IU 2%
  • Calcium 29mg 3%
  • Iron 1.1mg 6%
  • Niacin 1.3mg 10%
  • Folate 7.8mcg 2%
  • Magnesium 2.2mg 1%
  • Potassium 59.4mg 2%

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