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Goat / Chevon

A ruminant mammal of the Bovidae family, a goat, is closely related to the sheep. The meat from an adult goat is called chevon, while goat is usually the name for the meat found in common parlance. Producers and marketers may prefer to use the French-derived word “chevon” since market research in the United States suggests that it is more palatable to consumers than “goat meat.”

There are various domestic goat breeds available around the world that weigh around 15 kg to 130 kg on average, depending on the races. The males tend to be larger than the female. Their color varies depending on the breeds, but most colors include black, brown, red, tan, and white. Most of the domestic goats have beards and horns.

Goat Chevon Trivia

  • Chevon is the most consumed meat per capita worldwide. It is eaten by 63% of the world’s population.
  • Goats were one of the first animals to be tamed by humans and were being herded 9,000 years ago.
  • About 1.5 million pounds of chevon is imported into the US every week.
  • In the US, Nubian goats are the most common breed of dairy goat.
  • Goats will become depressed if kept without any companions. It is unhealthy for them if a family owns one as a pet.
  • Mothers can identify their kids by their smell.
  • Goats are very good at climbing; they’ve been known to climb to the tops of trees or even dams!
  • Sailors used to bring goats on trips so they could have fresh milk every day.
  • Goats can move their jaws between 40,000 and 60,000 times a day.
  • Goat milk is more digestible than cows.
  • The most expensive goat ever sold cost $194,547.20 US Dollars.

Definition:

Chevon: The meat of the goat.
Cabrito: A Spanish word, referring to a young, milk-fed goat.
Mutton: The word used to describe both goat and sheep meat in some parts of Asia.

Goat Chevon Buying Guide

When buying chevon or goat’s meat, the younger the goat, the better. The best cuts of meat are the ones around the joints in the limbs and the ribs and neck. If the meat is shiny and lustrous red, it is usually better than those which are thick and brown colored and where you can see fabric-like patterns. If you are not interested in oily food, do not take the fat because it will make your dish greasy.

If you are buying quantities smaller than 500g, go for a conservative mix. For larger quantities, you can opt for the full upper portion of a limb. The marrow makes excellent food-nutrition combo.

Goat Chevon Production & Farming in Texas

Goats are common and mostly raised domestic or farm animals. Keeping them healthy starts with the proper housing, fencing, and feed. There are two kinds of goats available in nature: the typical domestic goats and the wild goats that live in some parts of Europe and Asia. They are similar to their domesticated counterparts, but their characteristics are different. They live in conifer forests and mountainous regions. They consume most of the things that they find edible in the woods, including grass, various types of leaves, berries, tree barks, foliage, twigs, and other types of greens.

Domestic goats are the result of the taming of the wild goats. There are various breeds of domestic goats available throughout the world. You can easily manage domestic goats if you have an adequate amount of grass or other greens around your farm. Domestic goats are known to be very friendly in nature and gentle. If you limit domestic goats inside a fence, they will live and grow happily. Domestic goats also love to eat different types of leaves and grains. And they love to live in a clean environment.

The demand for goat meat is rising as more people from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean settled in the US. In 2012, farmers reported more than 2 million goats living in the US America’s goat population is heavily concentrated in the Southwest, Texas, in particular. Nearly 80 percent of America’s goats are raised for meat. Sixteen percent are raised for milk, with the remaining 6 percent is comprised of Angora goats raised for mohair.

Geography:

Goats are not known to the Americas until Columbus brought them in 1493. They originated from the mountainous areas of West Asia and eastern Europe, grazing on hillsides and plains. For thousands of years, goats have been used for their meat, hair, milk, and skins. In some countries, goats are also used to help with carrying heavy loads.

Eating Goats Chevons

Chevon is a delicious red meat that can be eaten stewed, baked, grilled, barbequed, or made into sausage or jerky.

Storage:

Store ground goat meat only 1 or 2 days in the refrigerator before either cooking or freezing it. Roasts, steaks, and chops can be kept refrigerated 3 to 5 days before cooking. After cooking, keep refrigerated 3 to 4 days. For the best quality, cooked meat and raw ground meat can be frozen and used within 3 to 4 months. Fresh steaks, roasts, and chops can be kept frozen 6 to 9 months. However, any frozen meat is safe indefinitely. Only the quality (flavor, texture, moistness) decreases during more extended storage.

Cooking:

Chevon can be eaten from any age, depending upon your preference. Meat from a young goat resembles veal, while meat from more adult goats is more like a venison and beef mixture but without all the calories. Most people prefer meat from goats that are under one year of age due to it being more tender.

The meat of goats can be cooked by stewing, frying, barbecuing, baking, grilling, and it can also be minced, made into sausage, or used in curries and soups.

When cooking chevon, you may tenderize the cut of meat manually before cooking by pounding it with a tenderizing mallet or scoring it with a knife. This process will flatten out the meat and breakdown the muscle fibers and the structure that adds to the toughness of lean and low-fat meat.

Nutrition:

Goat meat is often referred to as the healthiest of all red meats. It is lower in cholesterol than any game meats and is a very good source of protein. The saturated fat content of chevon is 40% less than that of chicken, and even you remove the skin. It is also 50-60% lower in fat than similarly prepared beef, but it has the same or more protein content.

Vitamins and Minerals:

Vitamin A: Important for normal vision, the immune system, and reproduction.
Vitamin B6: To help keep the brain and nervous system healthy — and for heart health, muscle function, and a lot more.
Vitamin B12: It is important for the healthy formation of red blood cells and the health of the nerve tissues.
Vitamin C: It is necessary for the growth, development, and repair of all body tissues.
Vitamin D: Performs a vital role in the regulation of calcium and maintenance of phosphorus levels in the blood.
Calcium: To build and maintain strong bones.
Iron: Helps to preserve many vital functions in the body, including universal energy and focus, gastrointestinal processes, the immune system, and the regulation of body temperature.
Magnesium: It is important for healthy bone structure in the body.

Nutrition

DV%

  • Serving Size: 1 Serving
  • Calories: 143 7%
  • Carbs: 0g 0%
  • Sugar: 0g 0%
  • Fiber: 0g 0%
  • Protein: 27.1g 54%
  • Fat: 3g 5%
  • Saturated Fat: 0.9g 5%
  • Trans Fat 0g 0%
  • Cholesterol 75mg 25%
  • Sodium 86mg 4%
  • Vitamin C 0mg 0%
  • Vitamin A 0IU 0%
  • Calcium 17mg 2%
  • Iron 3.7mg 21%
  • Potassium 405mg 12%
  • Vitamin E 0.3mg 2%
  • Vitamin K 1.2mcg 1%
  • Vitamin B6 0mg 0%
  • Folate 5mcg 1%
  • Vitamin B12 1.2mcg 20%
  • Magnesium 0mg 0%
  • Phosphorus 201mg 20%
  • Zinc 5.3mg 35%

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